Wolfberry Leaf with Egg Drop in Chicken Broth

Soup Name: Wolfberry Leaf with Egg Drop in Chicken Broth

Traditional Chinese Name: 枸杞雞湯 (gǒu gǒu jī tāng)

Introduction:

A delicious soup that is rich in the unique flavors of the wolfberry leaves.  The very neat thing about this soup is that the base is an old fire soup, while when adding the final ingredients, it’s a quick boil soup.  This is a classic from my mother and she even grew her own wolfberry plants just for the sole purpose of making this soup!

Ingredients:

1 fresh whole chicken, prepared
1 pound of fresh pork shank
4 fresh sea snails, prepared
5-6 dried scallops (conpoys)
10 dried longans
3 stems of wolfberry leaves, washed and picked off stems
3 eggs, scrambled
2-3 L of water

How do I prepare it

  1. Prepare snail by thoroughly cleaning and rubbing it in warm water
  2. In a pot of hot water, blanch chicken, pork shank and snail
  3. Begin to boil your soup water and add conpoys and longans
  4. When water boils, add both blanched chicken and pork shank (this is the base of your soup)
  5. Boil on high for 30 minutes and then reduce to a simmer for another 1 hour
  6. Wash wolfberry leaves and set aside
  7. When ready to serve, add wolfberry leaves and boil for 5 minutes on high heat (or until leaves are soft)
  8. Slowly pour in scrambled eggs while continuously mixing the soup, boil for another 5 minutes
  9. Serve and enjoy!

Any benefits?

  • Has an effect to remove heatiness
  • It aids in reducing thirst and has a calming effect on the body (thereby eliminating anxiety)
  • Extremely high carotene content
  • Excellent source of Vitamin E

Any precautions?

  • Some species of wolfberries and leaves are known to contain a toxic ingredient called Atropine (naturally occurring)
  • Not many concrete studies are available on the benefits of wolfberries and their leaves
  • Said to be slightly cooling, so precaution to be taken with women who are pregnant in their first trimester (as cooling ingredients cause contractions)
  • Snails need thorough cleaning (see preparation for more details)

Wolfberry Leaves

Ingredient Name: Wolfberry leaves (also known as goji berry leaves, barbary matrimony vine leaves, bocksdorn leaves, Duke of Argyll’s tea tree leaves, red medlar leaves or matrimony vine leaves)

Traditional Chinese Name: 枸杞 (gǒu gǒu)

Yes, this picture is of the wolfberry plant!  It was grown in my mother’s backyard vegetable garden and for the sole purpose of soup production.  I used to drink this soup all the time as a child and it still brings back fond memories of my great soup past.  However, I never (and still don’t) enjoy eating the leaves, but they do make for a healthy and rich soup.  The taste is very distinct and it’s either you love it or hate it.  The Chinese say that the taste is very “golden”.

What is this?
  • Young shoots grow to be about 2-3 m in height with heart shaped light to dark green leaves
  • They grow in bundles with a very strong and firm bark or stem
  • A relatively easy plant to grow and are suitable for growth in most regions (they often grow wildly in fields)
  • They are slightly cold in nature and the leaves are slightly bitter to taste
  • Leaves are often used in Chinese herbal teas and soups (or as a leaf vegetable in dishes)

How do I prepare it?

  • Remove from stem and rinse in warm water

Where can I buy this?

  • Most Asian supermarkets will carry this produce fresh

What is the cost?

  • Wolfberry leaves are very affordable with a few dollars (CAD)  per large bunch

Any benefits?

  • Has an effective to remove heatiness
  • It aids in reducing thirst and has a calming effect on the body (thereby eliminating anxiety)
  • Extremely high carotene content
  • Excellent source of Vitamin E

Any precautions?

  • Some species of wolfberries and leaves are known to contain a toxic ingredient called Atropine (naturally occurring)
  • Not many concrete studies are available on the benefits of wolfberries and their leaves
  • Said to be slightly cooling, so precaution to be taken with women who are pregnant in their first trimester (as cooling ingredients cause contractions)

Additional Information

  • Fresh wolfberry leaves can keep for up to 3 days in the fridge

References:

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfberry#Leaves_and_flower