Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

Soup Name

Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base)

Traditional Chinese Name:  

清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)

 

Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I’ll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling soups.  You can mix and match the types of vegetables to bring out the types of flavours you like, but I will usually always use some chicken bones, legs, or carcass along with dried scallops (these are almost a must for the stock soup!).   

The benefits:

  • Perfect for any soup base. You can simply add your favourite vegetables or even Chinese herbs.
  • This soup is perfect for cooler days as it’s slightly warming
  • Perfect for confinement, postpartum, and post period
  • Ideal for the whole family, including children
  • These ingredients are readily available in most Chinese supermarkets around the world, all you need is just a chicken!
  • Be sure to to consult your (Chinese) doctor first if you’re unsure of consumption or suitability
  • You can store this soup base in a plastic container (or jar with a wide mouth so it’s easier to use back later) for up to 6 months in the freezer
  • I’ve used this as a soup base for both noodles soups and even hotpot!  It’s very versatile in what you can do with it!

What’s involved?

Prep time: 30 mins

Cook time: 3 hours

Total time: 3 hours 30 mins

Serves: 8 bowls 

Ingredients

Cooking Instructions

  1. Begin to boil a separate pot for blanching the meat
  2. Soak the dried conpoys and dried shiitake mushrooms in warm water for 10 minutes, the mushrooms may need longer, until they are soft, but since it’s for the soup base, it’s ok if they are still a bit hard.
  3. You can also begin to boil your soup water
  4. When your blanching water boils, add in the chicken bones and boil on high heat for 5 minutes. Make sure the water is boiling and you should see residue, fat, grim, and even foam come to the surface.
  5. In the meantime, you can prepare all your vegetable ingredients for the base.  I will cut the onion in half, keeping on the stem so it stays intact and cut the carrots and corn into large pieces so I can easily remove them from the pot.
  6. Once your soup water boils, remove the meat from the blanching pot and shake off any excess and slowly lower into your soup water
  7. Add in dried conpoys, dried mushrooms, and all the vegetables into the pot
  8. Boil on medium heat for 30 minutes
  9. Reduce heat to the lowest and cover and let it simmer like that for another 2-3 hours (or use a thermal pot). The soup should now be a rich, golden color after boiling for so long. Be sure to scoop out any oil, fat bits, or skin from the top with an oil scooper.
  10. And you can also remove all the ingredients with a strainer so that you’re left with a beautiful soup base which you can use for other soups or dishes!

For video on “7 Basic Chinese Soup Pantry Ingredients”, visit us on YouTube.

Here are some examples of other soups using a chicken soup base:

The chicken soup base is a great soup to start with for so many dishes and soups!  Here are a few to get you started!

This is a great and very simple chicken soup that I use as a base.  My kids love drinking this as plain chicken soup.  

    Using this chicken soup base for shabu shabu is the perfect solution to start your hot pot adventures! 

      This soup is using the base chicken soup recipe that is perfect for double-boiling.  For example, the only additional ingredient added here is the ginseng on top of the soup base.

        EXPLORE MORE

        Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

        Soup Name:  Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base) Traditional Chinese Name:   清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)  Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I'll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name: Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink Traditional Chinese Name: 竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)   For videos, visit us on YouTube. A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese SoupsDid your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you're too "yeet hay" (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it...

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able...

        The “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of Chinese Confinement

        THE DO's and DON'T's Of Chinese Confinement It all starts with one key principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine:  Re-balance the Yin and Yang in the body. The energy in the body post birth is normally in an increased yin (cooling) state due to the loss of blood and...

        Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese Soup

        Soup Name: Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese SoupFor more videos, visit us on YouTube.No time?  Cost saving?  Want something quick?  I've been making these quick boil Chinese soups for awhile now!  You can still make healthy and delicious soups without that...

        Homemade Do-it-yourself Wontons in a “Cheat” Chicken Broth

        Did you know that wontons literally means "cloud swallow" in Cantonese?  These little delights are like clouds and bite-sized enough to be swallowed in one gulp! For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create awesome wontons at home!   What...

        Turkey Chinese Congee (Porridge)

        Soup Name: Turkey Chinese Congee Traditional Chinese Name: 火雞粥 (huǒ jī zhōu) Introduction: What to do with a 19 pound turkey for a family of 6? Well, after carving it, you have more meat leftover than carcass and I’ve taken half of the carcass for congee and the other...

        A Do-It-Yourself Japanese Shabu Shabu Experience

        Check out this 2 part homemade broth and Japanese-styled shabu shabu experience!Serves: Party of 4-6 Prep Time:  30 mins Cook Time:  3 hours and 15 mins Eat Time:  Endless For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create an awesome and...

        Cooking Chinese Soups With a Thermal Induction Pot

        I could not contain my excitement when I got my new Thermal Induction Pot! Check out the video above for the unpack and how to use it.For more videos, visit us on YouTube. What makes this pot so special? Due to its engineered induction design, the pot itself will...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name:

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Traditional Chinese Name:

        竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)

         

        For videos, visit us on YouTube. 

        A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this can be drank cold or hot. It is commonly found as a drink in most herbal dessert shops and is even bottled commercially.

        There are a few options for this tea such as adding sugared dried winter melon and corn silk or baby corn.  The key ingredient is the imperatae, which is grass type plant that is cooling and sweet.  It targets the stomach, lungs, and bladder and supports heat removal, or excess of Yang qi in the body.

        What’s involved?

        Prep time: 10 mins

        Cook time: 60 minutes

        Total time: 70 mins

        Serves: 6 bowls

        Ingredients

         

        Cooking Instructions

        1. Begin boiling your soup water
        2. Begin boiling another pot of water to blanch Imperatae
        3. Cut carrots, corn, water chestnuts and sugar cane
        4. When second water boils, blanch Imperatae
        5. When soup water boils, add all ingredients together
        6. Boil on medium heat for a good 1 hour
        7. Serve and enjoy!

        Any benefits?

        • This is a great tea for BBQ’ing or hotpot as it’s cooling and removes heat from the body, especially the stomach
        • It can served as a tea or soup
        • It is vegetarian, so perfect for any soup or tea drinker
        • This can be drank cold or hot (you’ll often find this as a heated drink served in the streets of Hong Kong)
        • You can make a big pot and store in the fridge for one week.  Just be sure to let it sit to room temperature or heat up before consumption
        • You can have a few variations of this soup or tea depending on ingredients at home (such as adding sugared dried winter melon, water chestnuts, or simply using sugar cane and imperatae)

        For videos, visit us on YouTube. 

        EXPLORE MORE

        Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

        Soup Name:  Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base) Traditional Chinese Name:   清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)  Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I'll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name: Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink Traditional Chinese Name: 竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)   For videos, visit us on YouTube. A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese SoupsDid your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you're too "yeet hay" (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it...

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able...

        The “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of Chinese Confinement

        THE DO's and DON'T's Of Chinese Confinement It all starts with one key principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine:  Re-balance the Yin and Yang in the body. The energy in the body post birth is normally in an increased yin (cooling) state due to the loss of blood and...

        Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese Soup

        Soup Name: Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese SoupFor more videos, visit us on YouTube.No time?  Cost saving?  Want something quick?  I've been making these quick boil Chinese soups for awhile now!  You can still make healthy and delicious soups without that...

        Homemade Do-it-yourself Wontons in a “Cheat” Chicken Broth

        Did you know that wontons literally means "cloud swallow" in Cantonese?  These little delights are like clouds and bite-sized enough to be swallowed in one gulp! For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create awesome wontons at home!   What...

        Turkey Chinese Congee (Porridge)

        Soup Name: Turkey Chinese Congee Traditional Chinese Name: 火雞粥 (huǒ jī zhōu) Introduction: What to do with a 19 pound turkey for a family of 6? Well, after carving it, you have more meat leftover than carcass and I’ve taken half of the carcass for congee and the other...

        A Do-It-Yourself Japanese Shabu Shabu Experience

        Check out this 2 part homemade broth and Japanese-styled shabu shabu experience!Serves: Party of 4-6 Prep Time:  30 mins Cook Time:  3 hours and 15 mins Eat Time:  Endless For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create an awesome and...

        Cooking Chinese Soups With a Thermal Induction Pot

        I could not contain my excitement when I got my new Thermal Induction Pot! Check out the video above for the unpack and how to use it.For more videos, visit us on YouTube. What makes this pot so special? Due to its engineered induction design, the pot itself will...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Did your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you’re too “yeet hay” (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it was good for you and would help with your heaty body?  This was me!  And you grew up understanding this term called “yeet hay”, but it wasn’t easily translatable in English, but yet… you know.  And now it comes back in full circle, understanding the principles in Traditional Chinese medicine, why there’s this re-balance in our diets!

        One guiding principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine is the yin yang theory.  In the natural world, there exists a balance between 2 opposing and co-existing forces and yet, they also exist in each other.  Our bodies, minds, and souls are designed the same way in that to be healthy, we need to be in harmony between these 2 bipolar states.  Yin is receptive and passive, calm and slow, embodying cold and damp qualities (when we are sleeping).  Yang is its exact opposite in aggressive and active, embodying heat, dryness, and movement (when we are awake).

        One of our mission at The Chinese Soup Lady is to bring these principles into the foods and drinks we consume in order to support harmony.  

        How to use this guide:

        • This is purely a reference guide on what to consider as your soup ingredients
        • Most Chinese soups have a combination of protein, vegetables or roots, and some simple herbs (such as dried longans or dried red dates)
        • It’s not as easy as a mix and match!  Although I wish it were.  I would really suggest doing some research on the combinations available, such as existing recipes out there or ask friends and family.
        • Do consult a physician if you’re unsure of your health and what to consume

         

        Tips and examples:

        • Consider the complimentary tastes of ingredients (it’s not really a mix and match at random!).  There are pairings that have worked for the TCM principles above such as balancing yin and yang.
        • For example, the Cantonese dessert of silky tofu pudding (tofu fa) is usually combined with a ginger brown syrup.  This is because the tofu is highly cooling and the ginger will offset that.
        • For example, winter melon is best combined with pork rather than chicken (although I have tried that) to maintain the cooling effects of the soup.  Winter melon is promoted as a summer soup for this very reason, so making it with warmer protein will reduce that effectiveness.
        •  The external environment also has an impact to your yin and yang balance.  In the winter, we nourish the yang more to stay warm and in the spring, we want to reduce the yin to dispel moisture from the body.
        • For example, chicken soups and especially double-boiled soups are recommended in the winter to keep us warm.  Ginger is a great add to soups, including dried longans, which are all warming.  The same applies to summer and hot weather where the Chinese lean towards watercress, gourds, and melon soups.
        • Our internal state is probably the most important in determining which soup to make and how this principle helps.
        • For example, postpartum is an important moment for women in recovering their balance for the long term.  In postpartum, the body is in need of yang nourishment due to blood and fluid loss of childbirth.  This is why all the foods, soups, and teas created for confinement are hot or warming and tend to be packed full of ginger.
        • For example, the scratchy, bumpy, and inflamed tongue is a great example of too much heat (or yang) in our bodies.  This is common when we have lack of sleep (remember how yang is active) or eat too much fried food (another source of heat into our bodies), so having cooling teas or soups will help relieve the excess yang.

         

        EXPLORE MORE

        Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

        Soup Name:  Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base) Traditional Chinese Name:   清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)  Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I'll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name: Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink Traditional Chinese Name: 竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)   For videos, visit us on YouTube. A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese SoupsDid your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you're too "yeet hay" (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it...

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able...

        The “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of Chinese Confinement

        THE DO's and DON'T's Of Chinese Confinement It all starts with one key principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine:  Re-balance the Yin and Yang in the body. The energy in the body post birth is normally in an increased yin (cooling) state due to the loss of blood and...

        Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese Soup

        Soup Name: Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese SoupFor more videos, visit us on YouTube.No time?  Cost saving?  Want something quick?  I've been making these quick boil Chinese soups for awhile now!  You can still make healthy and delicious soups without that...

        Homemade Do-it-yourself Wontons in a “Cheat” Chicken Broth

        Did you know that wontons literally means "cloud swallow" in Cantonese?  These little delights are like clouds and bite-sized enough to be swallowed in one gulp! For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create awesome wontons at home!   What...

        Turkey Chinese Congee (Porridge)

        Soup Name: Turkey Chinese Congee Traditional Chinese Name: 火雞粥 (huǒ jī zhōu) Introduction: What to do with a 19 pound turkey for a family of 6? Well, after carving it, you have more meat leftover than carcass and I’ve taken half of the carcass for congee and the other...

        A Do-It-Yourself Japanese Shabu Shabu Experience

        Check out this 2 part homemade broth and Japanese-styled shabu shabu experience!Serves: Party of 4-6 Prep Time:  30 mins Cook Time:  3 hours and 15 mins Eat Time:  Endless For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create an awesome and...

        Cooking Chinese Soups With a Thermal Induction Pot

        I could not contain my excitement when I got my new Thermal Induction Pot! Check out the video above for the unpack and how to use it.For more videos, visit us on YouTube. What makes this pot so special? Due to its engineered induction design, the pot itself will...

        GIVE YOUR LOVE OF SOUP.

        FOLLOW US AND SHARE.

        ON YOUTUBE

        ON INSTAGRAM

        ON FACEBOOK

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able to drink it – especially with all the yummy insides that go with it! So I did manage to find a baby whole winter melon – which will fit into my soup pot, so here’s the recipe for it. You can actually use this on a whole winter melon, but you’ll need to just cut off whatever amount doesn’t fit into your pot and go from there. This is a pretty labour intensive soup with many steps, but so worth it!

        Soup Name:

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        Traditional Chinese Name:

        冬瓜盅 (dōng guā zhōng)

         

        For soup and recipe videos, visit us on YouTube.

        You’ll need: 1 whole winter melon, dried shrimp, dried conpoy, fresh shrimp, fresh pork, dried mushrooms, straw mushrooms, salt, cornstarch, oil and chicken broth.  In actuality, this is a quick boil soup first and then double-boiled within the winter melon – or at least, that’s how this recipe goes. The thicker the winter melon, the longer it will need to be double-boiled, but at least you make the soup base first.

        To start, soak all your dried Chinese goodies for 10-15 minutes – this includes the mushrooms, the conpoys and the shrimp.

        Cut up the mushrooms. We don’t need the mushrooms ends, so you can discard this. Cut the mushrooms into tiny cubes. The idea is to use consistency across all the soup ingredients so they are the same size.

        You can start working on “emptying” the winter melon. Start by slicing the top straight across, these beautiful parts can be used in your soup (less skin). Using a sharp, thin, knife, cut about 1 inch away from the edge and completely remove all the middle. You can discard the seeds first and keep the flesh to be added back into the soup. Go deep and leave about 1-inch from the bottom, you’ll have to be careful here and just eyeball it. Try really hard not to puncture the winter melon!  Using any parts of the leftover winter melon, cube that into the same size as the mushrooms. This will be used for your soup later.

        Same with your meats. Cube the raw shrimp and raw pork. After this, you can mix them together with a bit of salt, oil and corn starch, in preparation for frying.  In a pot, add a tiny bit of oil and pan fry the dried shrimp and conpoy. This makes the fragrance and all the flavours are ready to come out in the soup. In Cantonese, there’s a term called “exploding the fragrance” of the ingredients.

        When cooked for about 3 minutes on medium-high heat, throw in the raw shrimp and pork and stir that around a little bit for another 5 minutes.

        You will then have a beautiful and very fragrant medley of your meats for the soup. Good enough to just eat on its own – for sure! But don’t!! You need it for the soup!

        Here’s where it gets tricky. I made a giant pot of soup – so much that it doesn’t fit into the winter melon, which is OK, because you can still drink the quick boil as a quick boil soup any way. I used 1 part chicken broth and 2 parts water – this is because I don’t like soup too salty, and you can always add more salt or chicken broth after.
        So now, throw everything into your pot. The broth and the straw mushrooms (which are also diced) and the diced winter melon.

        Let that boil on medium heat for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in your double-boiler, set it up so that you have a the winter melon sitting on a metal low dish (to catch any soup just in case) and add hot water to the outside double-boiler.

        Once it’s set up, you can turn up the flame to a medium-high to get the water boiling. Once your other quick boil soup is read, scoop in generous amounts of the meats and “stuff” (fill about half) and then fill the rest with the soup. It won’t all fill, but tis is life sometimes!

        The idea is that the heat will soften the winter melon bowl and the flavours of the soup will just seep into the flesh and make it so deliciously yummy! Boil on a medium heat for about 30 minutes, or until you see that the winter melon has softened and turned translucent. This means, it’s ready!

        Finally, serve! Use a hardy soup ladle and scoop the soup meats, the soup itself and don’t forget to go for the outer winter melon flesh – that’s why it’s cooked in the double-boiler!

        This was one awesome soup and I was super proud that it was a huge success on my first attempt! I’ve also had requests to try it with a larger winter melon, so that will be my next project. There are so many variations you can make on the soup though, like including Chinese preserved ham, ham, go vegetarian?, carrots, onions – whatever!

        What’s involved?

        Prep time: 1 hour

        Cook time: 30 mins pre-boil on soup + 2 hours in double-boiler (or until the whole outer melon softens)

        Total time: 3 hours and 30 minutes

        Serves: 4-5 bowls

        Ingredients

        • 1 small whole winter melon (that has to fit in your double-boil pot) – emptied and cube the flesh
        • 7 fresh shrimp, beheaded and peeled
        • 1/2 pound of fresh pork
        • 5 dried conpoys (or scallops)
        • 1 tablespoon of dried shrimp
        • 10 small dried Chinese mushrooms
        • 5 fresh straw mushrooms
        • salt (for taste as needed)
        • oil (for frying the ingredients first)
        • cornstarch (to thicken the soup as needed)

        Cooking Instructions

        1. Soak your dried Chinese ingredients in warm water for 10-15 minutes (Chinese mushrooms, conpoys, shrimp)
        2. Empty out the middle of your winter melon – keeping in completely intact with the exception of the top. Keep to 1-inch of melon left from the edge. Throw away the seeds.
        3. Cut all your ingredients into cubes – Chinese mushrooms (removing the stems), straw mushrooms, any left over winter melon, fresh shrimp, fresh pork
        4. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt, cornstarch and oil to your fresh shrimp and pork and mix
        5. In a pot, add a tiny bit of oil and fry (drain water) the dried conpoy and dried shrimp for 5 minutes on medium heat
        6. Throw in the raw shrimp and pork and fry for another 5 minutes
        7. Keep on medium heat, add in 1 part chicken broth and 2 parts boiling water
        8. Add in the remaining winter melon flesh and straw mushrooms
        9. Boil on medium for 30 minutes
        10. In your double-boiler, raise your winter melon (in a metal deep dish) and add hot water.
        11. Once your soup boils, scoop in enough stuff and soup to fill the winter melon.
        12. Boil on medium high for 30 minutes – or until the winter melon flesh is translucent.
        13. Serve all, including scooping the winter melon flesh and enjoy

        EXPLORE MORE

        Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

        Soup Name:  Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base) Traditional Chinese Name:   清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)  Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I'll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name: Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink Traditional Chinese Name: 竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)   For videos, visit us on YouTube. A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese SoupsDid your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you're too "yeet hay" (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it...

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able...

        The “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of Chinese Confinement

        THE DO's and DON'T's Of Chinese Confinement It all starts with one key principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine:  Re-balance the Yin and Yang in the body. The energy in the body post birth is normally in an increased yin (cooling) state due to the loss of blood and...

        Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese Soup

        Soup Name: Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese SoupFor more videos, visit us on YouTube.No time?  Cost saving?  Want something quick?  I've been making these quick boil Chinese soups for awhile now!  You can still make healthy and delicious soups without that...

        Homemade Do-it-yourself Wontons in a “Cheat” Chicken Broth

        Did you know that wontons literally means "cloud swallow" in Cantonese?  These little delights are like clouds and bite-sized enough to be swallowed in one gulp! For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create awesome wontons at home!   What...

        Turkey Chinese Congee (Porridge)

        Soup Name: Turkey Chinese Congee Traditional Chinese Name: 火雞粥 (huǒ jī zhōu) Introduction: What to do with a 19 pound turkey for a family of 6? Well, after carving it, you have more meat leftover than carcass and I’ve taken half of the carcass for congee and the other...

        A Do-It-Yourself Japanese Shabu Shabu Experience

        Check out this 2 part homemade broth and Japanese-styled shabu shabu experience!Serves: Party of 4-6 Prep Time:  30 mins Cook Time:  3 hours and 15 mins Eat Time:  Endless For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create an awesome and...

        Cooking Chinese Soups With a Thermal Induction Pot

        I could not contain my excitement when I got my new Thermal Induction Pot! Check out the video above for the unpack and how to use it.For more videos, visit us on YouTube. What makes this pot so special? Due to its engineered induction design, the pot itself will...

        Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

        Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

        Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

        Soup Name:

        Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Chinese Confinement)

        Traditional Chinese Name:

        糖醋排骨 (táng cù páigǔ)

        For cooking videos, visit us on YouTube. 

        This is another one of those great recipes that are handed down through generations. I got this from an Auntie who is an amazing cook and simplified this recipe so that it’s so simple and yet, tastes so good! You can use a variety of rib cuts – I’ve made it with the traditional Chinese spare ribs cut (pictured here), but also made it using baby back ribs, too. When I make this, I use the measurements as a base, but adjust it as it cooks. I know some people prefer it sweeter or more sour or more salty, so definitely sample your cooking as you go!

        For this recipe, I will use a fatter cut of meat. This is because it stews for quite some time and you don’t want the pork to dry out and shrivel up into dried pork. Over time, the fat will come out and you can simply scoop it out before consumption.

        I will also rinse the pork in warm water when I get them from the vendor (just in case). Then throw it into a stainless steel pot and follow this simple base for recipe. It’s basically 1-2-3 (tablespoons).

        1 tablespoon of soy sauce
        2 tablespoons of sugar (any type)
        3 tablespoons of white vinegar

        And then you proportion it out appropriately. So for the amount picture above, which is around 1 pound of spare ribs, I multiplied by 3, so I got 3 tablespoons of soy sauce, 6 tablespoons of sugar, and 9 tablespoons of white vinegar. If you want, you can add a quarter cup of water for good measure. For confinement, my recommendation is to load up on ginger. This can be ginger slices, ginger cubes, the whole ginger, grated ginger, ginger juice – however spicy you can take it, do it. Optional ingredients also include whole garlic, black or white pepper and even star anise.

        What’s involved?

        Prep time: 10 mins

        Cook time: 30+ mins (checking every 10 mins based on softness of meat and viscosity of the sauce)

        Total time: 40+ mins

        Serves: 1 large bowl

        Ingredients

        • 1 pound of fresh spare ribs or pork ribs
        • 1 x 3 = 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
        • 2 x 3 = 6 tablespoons of sugar
        • 3 x 3 = 9 tablespoons of white vinegar
        • 1-inch root of fresh ginger
        • 1/4 cup of water

        Instructions

        1. Rinse your spare ribs or pork ribs in warm water (to clean)
        2. Put all the ingredients into a stainless steel pot (or clay pot)
        3. Boil on high heat for 10 minutes
        4. Reduce to a low simmer for another hour, checking every 10 minutes on taste and whether it is drying out too much. If so, add another quarter cup of water.
        5. Remove oil and serve

        FOLLOW OUR Confinement STORIES

        A selection of confinement Chinese Soups

        What is confinement and confinement stories

        Baby 5 & 6 Confinement story

        Some confinement foods for your tummy!

        The DO's and DON'T's of confinement

        EXPLORE MORE

        Basic Chicken Soup (Base)

        Soup Name:  Basic Chinese Chicken Soup Stock (Soup Base) Traditional Chinese Name:   清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)  Here is another version of the basic chicken soup.  I'll make this so that it can serve as a base for noodles, macaroni, with rice, or for double-boiling...

        Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink

        Soup Name: Sugar Cane and Imperatae Drink Traditional Chinese Name: 竹蔗茅根 (zhú zhè máogēn)   For videos, visit us on YouTube. A traditional Chinese drink which helps cool the body and reduce heatiness. It’s natural sweetness is perfect for hot summer days and this...

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese Soups

        Your guide to COOLING and WARMING ingredients in Chinese SoupsDid your parents or grandparents ever tell you that you're too "yeet hay" (heaty) and would make you a cooling soup or tea or drink, such as watercress soup or winter melon and then go on to explain that it...

        Double-boiled Whole Winter Melon Soup

        I’ve always been in awe with the restaurant-styled whole winter melon soups – I mean, how on earth did they do that? They must have some giant double-boiler inside and it always taste so yummy! It’s a true favourite of mine when I go to Chinese restaurants to be able...

        The “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of Chinese Confinement

        THE DO's and DON'T's Of Chinese Confinement It all starts with one key principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine:  Re-balance the Yin and Yang in the body. The energy in the body post birth is normally in an increased yin (cooling) state due to the loss of blood and...

        Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese Soup

        Soup Name: Fragrant Pork and Cabbage Quick Boil Chinese SoupFor more videos, visit us on YouTube.No time?  Cost saving?  Want something quick?  I've been making these quick boil Chinese soups for awhile now!  You can still make healthy and delicious soups without that...

        Homemade Do-it-yourself Wontons in a “Cheat” Chicken Broth

        Did you know that wontons literally means "cloud swallow" in Cantonese?  These little delights are like clouds and bite-sized enough to be swallowed in one gulp! For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create awesome wontons at home!   What...

        Turkey Chinese Congee (Porridge)

        Soup Name: Turkey Chinese Congee Traditional Chinese Name: 火雞粥 (huǒ jī zhōu) Introduction: What to do with a 19 pound turkey for a family of 6? Well, after carving it, you have more meat leftover than carcass and I’ve taken half of the carcass for congee and the other...

        A Do-It-Yourself Japanese Shabu Shabu Experience

        Check out this 2 part homemade broth and Japanese-styled shabu shabu experience!Serves: Party of 4-6 Prep Time:  30 mins Cook Time:  3 hours and 15 mins Eat Time:  Endless For more videos, visit us on YouTube.Check out the video on how to create an awesome and...

        Cooking Chinese Soups With a Thermal Induction Pot

        I could not contain my excitement when I got my new Thermal Induction Pot! Check out the video above for the unpack and how to use it.For more videos, visit us on YouTube. What makes this pot so special? Due to its engineered induction design, the pot itself will...