Corn, Pumpkin and Carrots in Pork Broth

Soup Name: Corn, Pumpkin and Carrots in Pork Broth

Traditional Chinese Name: 玉米南瓜蘿蔔湯 (yù mǐ nán guā hóng luóbo tāng)

Introduction:
Another variation of vegetable pork broth.  The beauty of pork broth and natural vegetables is the different types of soups you can make based on seasonality and availability of various vegetables.  I like orange veggies because of their intensity of beta-carotene and it eats like a meal.  Just another great soup that is naturally sweet and perfect for the whole family.

What Ingredients are required?

1 pound of fresh pork shank
3 large carrots
2 fresh corn
1/2 fresh Japanese pumpkin

1 teaspoon of salt (for marinating pork)
2-3 L of water

How do I prepare it?

  1. Marinate pork in salt overnight (to expel the fire in the pork)
  2. Boil your soup water
  3. In a separate pot, boil water to blanch your pork
  4. Wash and chop all ingredients (pumpkin is both OK with or without skin)
  5. When your soup water boils, add all the ingredients together
  6. Boil on high heat for 30 minutes, reduce to a medium boil for another 1 hour
  7. Serve and enjoy!

Any benefits?

  • Soup extremely high in Vitamin A, C, and beta-carotene
  • 100% natural ingredients ideal for children and pregnancies

Any precautions?

  • None!

Lemon Grass

Ingredient Name: Lemon Grass, lemongrass, Cymbopogon citratus, wire grass, citronella grass, fever grass etc..

Traditional Chinese Name: 香茅草 (Xiāng máo căo) – literal translation of “fragrant grass”

What is this?

  • A tall, green grass that is native to India and used widely in Thai and Vietnamese cuisines
  • Extremely fragrant with a citrus flavor and is used in soups, teas, stews and curries

How do I prepare it?

  • Rinse in warm water
  • Can be used in dishes or soups cut in larger pieces or as a whole stalk
  • It is usually used in small amounts to enhance flavors

Where can I buy this?

  • Available in wet marts in Hong Kong
  • Readily available in markets in South East Asia
  • Not always commonly available in western supermarkets – although it is also available in dried or powdered forms (not as fragrant or strong in flavors)

What is the cost?

  • 1 stalk Hong Kong cost around $1 (extremely affordable)

Any benefits?

  • There is an active ingredient in lemongrass similar to lemon peels called Citral – which aids in digestion
  • Said to also relieve headaches, muscle cramps and spasms

Additional Information:

  • Store in an air tight bag in the fridge for up to 3 weeks
  • Can be stored in the freezer for up to 6 months as well\

References:

Chili Peppers

Ingredient Name: Chili peppers, chilli, or chili

Traditional Chinese Name:辣椒 (Làjiāo)

What is this?

  • A small, long red vegetable with a green stem
  • It is the fruit of plant from the genus Capsicum
  • Used in a variety of cuisines (Mexican, Asian, African, Indian)
  • There are a large variety of chili pepper cultivated, each with a different “spicy” factor

How do I prepare it?

  • Be sure to purchase peppers that are firm to the touch and the skin is smooth (wrinkled peppers are less intense in flavors)
  • Rinse in warm water and use
  • For more intense flavor and hotness, cut up or chop the chili peppers

Where can I buy this?

  • Available in most supermarkets

What is the cost?

  • It is very affordable, coming in at a few dollars for a package of a few

Any benefits?

  • Yellow or red peppers contain a large amount of Vitamin C
  • All peppers are a good source of Vitamin B, Potassium, Magnesium and Iron

Any precautions?

  • Take caution when handling chili peppers as the peppers contain oils that can irritate the skin or eyes
  • It is said that a high consumption of chili can cause stomach problems (stomach reflux or cancer)
  • Should not be eaten whole (risk to bowel obstruction or perforation)

Additional Information:

  • Store in an air-tight container or bag for up to two weeks in the fridge
  • Avoid freezing peppers

References:

Red Lingzhi Lung Nourishing Soup

Soup Name: Red Lingzhi Lung Nourishing Soup

Traditional Chinese Name: 赤芝化痰潤肺湯 (Chì zhī huà tán rùn fèi tāng)

Introduction:
A great soup for nourishing lungs and expelling phlegm, it is ideal for people who have a cough, asthma, breathing conditions or simply want to give their lungs a boost.  I find that every once in a while this soup is great for Hong Kong or city dwellers because of the infinite air pollution.

What Ingredients are required?

1 pound of fresh pork shank
4-5 large dried dates
5-6 slices of dried red lingzhi
5 pieces of dried hawthorn
1 palm solomon’s seal (dried)
5 pieces of lucid asparagus root (dried)
15 pieces of euryale or fox nut
1 tablespoon (20 g) of black glutinous rice
1 tablespoon (5 g) of malt
50 g black eye beans
1 dried tangerine peel

1 teaspoon of salt (for marinating pork)
2-3 L of water

How do I prepare it?

  1. Marinate pork in salt overnight (to expel the fire in the pork)
  2. Boil your soup water
  3. In a separate pot, boil water to blanch your pork
  4. Wash and rinse all dried ingredients in warm water
  5. When your soup water boils, add all the ingredients together
  6. Boil on high heat for 30 minutes, reduce to a medium boil for another 1 hour and 45 minutes.
  7. Serve and enjoy!

Any benefits?

  • Helps with cough symptoms
  • Expels phlegm
  • Assist with nourishing and bringing moisture to lungs

Any precautions?

  • Use Chinese herbs in precaution (in minimal amounts if serving children)

Shanghai Talk Magazine Feature

We’re being featured in the April 2010 issue of “Shanghai Talk” Magazine in Shanghai!  The magazine is a local magazine that is produced for English readers in Shanghai and we’re featured in the HEALTH TALK section.  It’s pretty amazing how far reaching a soup movement like ours can get.  So far, we’ve grown to having 40,000+ pageview per month and a constant stream of requests and comments from our readers.

So, in short, thank you to our loyal readers and fans.  Without the support and readership, there would be no TheChineseSoupLady.Com.  In response to some of our readers’ comments, please do submit soups if you’d like to see it posted and we’ll credit you for it.

You can find the feature here –> “Chinese Soup Ladies” – hard copies on the way.

Thank you April, the editor of the magazine for taking the time to speak with us and write about it.  Thank you Debbie for the introduction.  Thank you for the continued support.