How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm.

Nature:  Warming

Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter

(You can read this article on the impact on your body of different food tastes!)

For more videos, you can follow us on YouTube.

I made this delicious, warming tea after I went for a cold run (3C outdoor temp) and really felt it in my lungs and hands.  This is a nice quick tea to make after I showered and warmed up to help increase blood circulation around the body.

 

What’s involved?

Prep time: 2 mins

Cook time: 5 mins

Total time: 7 mins

Serves: 2 cups

Ingredients
    Cooking Instructions
    1. Slice your ripe mandarin, keeping the skin on. 
    2. In a stove safe tea pot, add in your sliced mandarin and with a spoon or chopstick, smash the mandarin so that it’s somewhat broken and the juices are out.
    3. Add in the rest of your ingredients, the dried red dates, the wolfberries, the cinnamon stick.
    4. Add in 2.5 cups of cold water
    5. Set on your stove top and start on high heat until it boils. Reduce to medium heat and let that simmer for 5 minutes.
    6. Set aside and cool.  I’ll pour out at this time into a glass cup.
    7. No sugar needed as the mandarin is sweet enough!
    8. Serve and enjoy!

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    How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

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    How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

    Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

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    How to make a warming and healing red roses, red dates, cinnamon and honey herbal tea

    How to make a warming and healing red roses, red dates, cinnamon and honey herbal tea

    How to make a warming and healing red roses, red dates, cinnamon and honey herbal tea

    Tea Name: Warming and healing red roses and dried red dates with cinnamon and honey Chinese herbal tea

    Traditional Chinese Name: 玫瑰红枣茶 (méi guī hóng zǎochá)

    Nature:  Warming

    Taste: Sweet 

    (You can read this article on the impact on your body of different food tastes!)

    For more videos, you can follow us on YouTube.

    It’s still pretty cool in Toronto in March, so this slightly warm and spiced tea is perfect!  All these are warming ingredients with some soothing elements in the honey and help improve circulation and replenish qi in the body!

    You can actually drink this everyday at well, although this tea doesn’t recycle as nicely as a Red Dates and Longan Tea (where I can add about 3-4 cycles of hot water to keep the flavours rolling all day long).  You’ll notice that the rose buds to lose a lot of their flavours on the first boil, but still a delicious and fragrant tea that is perfect!  Just perfect!

     

    What’s involved?

    Prep time: 2 mins

    Cook time: 5 mins

    Total time: 7 mins

    Serves: 2 cups

    Ingredients
    • 10-15 dried red roses buds (unopened)
    • 3 dried red dates, halved and pitted
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 1 tablespoon of honey
    • 2 cups of water
    • 1 stovetop safe teapot
      Cooking Instructions
      1. In your stovetop safe teapot, add in the dried red rose buds, the dried red dates, and the cinnamon stick and your water.
      2. Fully cover.
      3. Put this on medium high heat on your stove and bring to that a full boil for 5 minutes.
      4. Reduce heat and let it cool slightly before you add the honey (as anything over 60C will destroy most of the antibacterial and benefits of honey, so allow it cool as you drink).
      5. Stir, serve, and enjoy!
      Any benefits?
      • This tea is ideal for warming the body, allowing for pushing out cold from the body and improving blood circulation
      • Red roses help regulate Qi and helps remove blood stagnation
      • Both the red roses and cinnamon help warm the spleen, a key organ in Traditional Chinese Medicine

      For videos, visit us on YouTube.

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      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

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      Why foot soaks (foot baths) are good for you?

      Why foot soaks (foot baths) are good for you?

      Why foot soaks (foot baths) are good for you?

      Don’t know where to start?

      Don’t know why you should start?

      Here are some answers to get you started from:

      • WHY you should do hot foot soaks
      • WHAT equipment you’ll need
      • HOW to do a foot soak
      • The BENEFITs of hot foot soaks
      • TIPs and TRICKs of hot foot soaks

      This post started from an extended question around another post on “What does it mean to have cold hands and feet? How to replenish qi and yang“: 

      Well, foot soaks or foot baths are one of my such lifestyle techniques that I use to improve my overall circulation in the body!  This is used in combination with a series of other techniques that are common in Traditional Chinese Medicine!  Keep reading to explore more!

      Why are hot foot soaks so good for you?

      From a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, doing regular foot soaks will:

       

      • Stimulate the flow in the body, allowing your Qi and blood to circulate better.  From a science perspective, heat expands things, so exposure to a heated environment will allow the skin, the nerves, the blood vessels, the lymph nodes, and the muscles to soften, loosen and expand somewhat, which will allow the blood and other liquids to flow more easily through the body.  
      • Reduce blood pressure.  According to multiple studies conducted (see additional sources below), even one 20 minutes foot soak in hot water will reduce blood pressure levels within the body.  Imagine the on-going benefits of this if you can do this repeatedly!
      • Detoxify your body through the opening of your pores and sweating it out (literally!).  As the hot water warms up your feet, it will begin to circulate warmer blood around your body to the point where you will feel warmth in your chest first and then eventually your forehead.  You will notice yourself sweating, which is a good thing!  This helps drive out toxins and clear our lymph nodes.
      • Deliver more nutrients and oxygen to parts of the body that are often colder, such as hands, feet, and neck.  Your body and organs need nutrients and oxygen in order to function, so enabling these to get there faster will allow your organs to function optimally.  This includes delivering more oxygen to key organs such as the heart and brain, which will also allow you to think more clearly.

       

      • Help calm the mind.  This is in connection with how hot foot soaks allow for more blood to pass through the brain over the same period of time, which means an increased flow of oxygen.  When paired with a steady, regular breath in and breath out (almost meditatively), this will help create clarity and calm in the brain and mind.  Often, doing a foot soak is a great moment to allow for some down time if you can do it in a private or quiet space.  I recommend being intentional about this to allow time from our busy lives to benefit both the mind and body simultaneously. 💗💗💗

      How to do a foot soak

      The most basic is to simply soak your feet in warm to hot water.  What my own Chinese doctor has suggested is to soak it until you break a sweat from your forehead.  At this point, you’ll know that the warm blood has worked it’s way up throughout your body enough to literally – break a sweat!

      I was curious about testing time, so I’ve structured my foot soaks quite scientifically, but you don’t have to.  You can just soak until you feel that sweat and finish up.

      What you’ll need:

      • A consistent source of hot (or warm) water
      • A bucket or foot bag to soak in (I’m using this product that my mom got for me!) 
      • A comfortable place to sit
      • Some water (or drinks) to stay hydrated
      • A book or something to occupy your time (meditating is also a great thing to do during this moment)
      • A towel (to dry off with afterwards)
      • A change of clothes or sweater (as you’re sweating, you’ll want to cool off gently)

      If you’re testing time, add in:

      • A timer
      Try foot soaks once a week!  It’s a great time to meditate and spend some “ME” time.
      Ever wonder why you do a hot foot soak before you get a foot massage (in most Chinese spas)?

      Some tips and tricks for doing hot foot soaks

      • I usually start with hotter water first and then add cooler water to adjust.  This is because you’d be surprised how hot you can take, but make sure you can truly soak in over a period of time.  It does cool over time though.  And be sure not to burn yourself!
      • You want to soak until you feel the heat first in your chest (you’ll definitely perspire from your chest first) and then eventually from your forehead and head.  This means the warmed blood from your feet is eventually making its way up to your head, which is what you want!
      • I’m using a deeper foot bag (vs a lower foot bucket which I refill as it cools).  This saves both water and energy as it is heat proof (it retains the heat within itself) and covers more surface area of the body to include up to my calves.
      • You can add Chinese herbs such as ginger or Astralagus root for added benefits.  Some people also use various salts.  Just be sure to thoroughly clean your bag or bucket afterwards.
      • I prefer to soak into the evening as it helps me wind down and relax.  Part of this is to treat it like a meditative and breathwork session as well.  Really lean into the moment to pause and focus on breath as you soak, this will help calm the body, mind, and allow you to sleep better at night.

      Here are 5 lifestyle choices to help improve blood circulation and improve yang (and Qi), especially as we age!

      Doing hot foot soaks is definitely one of my Chinese doctor’s suggestions as well something I’ve started doing more regularly!

      1. Yang, Xiao et al. “Maternal postnatal confinement practices and postpartum depression in Chinese populations: A systematic review.” PloS one vol. 18,10 e0293667. 30 Oct. 2023, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0293667
      2. Vyas, Samruddhi Chintaman et al. “Effect of hot arm and foot bath on heart rate variability and blood pressure in healthy volunteers.” Journal of complementary & integrative medicine vol. 17,1 /j/jcim.2019.17.issue-1/jcim-2018-0181/jcim-2018-0181.xml. 15 Aug. 2019, doi:10.1515/jcim-2018-0181

      Some or all of these links may contain Amazon product referral links; as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you. If you decide to use them, I would be grateful. If not, I am always thankful for your continued support! ❤️

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      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

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      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

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      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

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      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

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      FOLLOW US AND SHARE.

      How to improve blood circulation and increase Qi and yang (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective)

      How to improve blood circulation and increase Qi and yang (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective)

      How to improve blood circulation and increase Qi and yang (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective)

      One guiding principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine is the yin yang theory.  In the natural world, there exists a balance between 2 opposing and co-existing forces and yet, they also exist in each other.  Our bodies, minds, and souls are designed the same way in that to be healthy, we need to be in harmony between these 2 bipolar states.  Yin is receptive and passive, calm and slow, embodying cold and damp qualities (when we are sleeping).  Yang is its exact opposite in aggressive and active, embodying heat, dryness, and movement (when we are awake).

      One of our mission at The Chinese Soup Lady is to bring these principles into the foods and drinks we consume in order to support harmony.  

      How to use this guide:

      • This is purely a reference guide 
      • Do see a Chinese medicine practitioner as this information is not a replacement for a doctor

      This post started from an extended question around another post on “What does it mean to have cold hands and feet? How to replenish qi and yang“: 

      How to improve blood circulation and increase Qi and yang (Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective) with lifestyle changes (beyond the soups and teas!).

      As we age, we lose our yang naturally and become more yin, which is why we tend to slow down and are not as active as children.

      This is particularly true for women 35+ and men 40+ and this can be seen in the physical changes (especially women who potentially start perimenopause).

      How do you know?  And what can you do about it?

      Explore this video to learn about some of the signs that can indicate slowed Qi and yang and 5 lifestyle changes (and soups and teas) that can help you improve and maintain it so that you can be as healthy as possible into your “forever youth”.

      This is because my body is not the same as it used to be when I was younger and it’s important to maintain this one home that I’ve got!

      What is Qi (or yang) depletion?

      • is includes cold hands and feet where you feel they are cold all the time.  This is particularly obvious to me when I’m running or riding in cooler weather, even at 10C, my hands will feel cold pretty quickly and I’ll need gloves.  I see people in Toronto running in shorts in 5C and I’m in awe.  I can’t!  LOL… your hands and feet are one of the first body parts to be “sacrificed” when your body needs more warmth for the main meridians.  
      • Feeling cold all the time is similar to cold hands and feet, but this is progressively moving towards your body.  You’ll want to feel like you want a warm space or to increase the heat.  I’ve also started wearing wooly socks to bed to keep this part warm and it seems to help me stay comfortable.  It’s the worst with cold feet! 
      • Uneasy or restless sleep also occurs if your yang is out of balance.  Normally, when you’re sleeping, yin is increased and yang is decreased (yang being the active state in the body from a Traditional Chinese medicine perspective), however, when you’re off balance, sleep is one of the key things you’ll also notice, unless you’re deathly exhausted, but keep a tab over a period of a few weeks.  Everyone has their own circadian rhythms, but that’s what you’re looking for – consistency in the rhythm. 
      • Difficulty to focus or remain calm as our shen or spirit is also disturbed.  This is also connected to the sleep in that we sometimes feel uneasy or unsettled and may have more outbursts or unable to stay relaxed.  Having emotions are normal, that is part of human beings, but when the emotions become so central and focused on how we make decisions and live our lives, that’s when we aren’t able to let go and allow our body to destress.  There is a huge connection between mental, psychological stress and how healthy our body shows up. 
      • Slower or more difficulty in movements is connected to the slower flow of a weaker or slower pulse.  This is because the Qi and yang does not flow as it should in the body and there are blockages.   
      • Paler complexion or lip color is also a sign of the slower blood flow.  This is also indicated by the color of the tongue, which should normally be a vibrant red, but when the yang is depleted, the tongue will often show up paler and more on the pink-white side.

      Type of soups and teas to make to replenish qi and yang (for yang deficiency):

      Here are a few key principles to think about when designing or making soups that will help with yang deficiency and to help you replenish qi and yang.

      •  Use dried red dates in your teas or soups and be sure to have the pits removed as they are fiery and can create too much heat in the body.  Red dates help tonify the qi and blood, which also replenishes qi and blood, and helps those who have too much “cold” in the body, helping it warm up. 
      • Use fresh ginger as well, to support yang deficiency.  This is a powerhouse ingredient that warms and helps with qi circulation, especially around the middle burner (section around the stomach and contains all the digestive organs). 
      • The best protein for warming soups and to support yang deficiency is chicken.  My Chinese doctor recommends chicken breast (versus chicken with bones) so that you can maximize all the protein possible from the meat.  You can also use a black silkie chicken for this purpose.
      • Drink a power soup weekly (if you’re over 40 for a woman, as men can start at 50 and still be OK), especially if it’s winter. This is also a power soup for women who have just had a baby as “the postpartum period is critical for maternal health status after childbirth [1]”.

      1. Yang, Xiao et al. “Maternal postnatal confinement practices and postpartum depression in Chinese populations: A systematic review.” PloS one vol. 18,10 e0293667. 30 Oct. 2023, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0293667

      EQUIPMENT USED

      To answer your questions on what equipment I'm using, I've built a section here where you can find and explore what I'm using to make soups.  Ingredients are a little harder, but I will do my best as I source them around.  However, you can always message me on Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, or Facebook, and I will reply and try to point you in some direction!  

      A great help for fish or small bones in soups, including small ingredients such as barley, fox nuts, spices just to keep everything together.

      A MUST HAVE in the kitchen!  Energy saving, cost effective, and perfect for busy chefs!  Check out my article here that explains it.

      Another MUST HAVE in the kitchen for soups!  It's so fine that it will scoop off the top oil and foam layer when using meats in your soup!

      I use these types of stove top safe tea pots to make most of my herbal teas!

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      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

      How to make a delicious Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables)

      Soup Name: Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables) Traditional Chinese Name: 番茄魚湯 (fān qié yú tāng). The literal translation of this is Tomato Fish Soup. However, this is such a generic name for the soup base (consisting usually of fish and tomatoes), but...

      How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

      Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

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      What does it mean to have cold hands and feet?  How to replenish qi and yang

      What does it mean to have cold hands and feet? How to replenish qi and yang

      What does it mean to have cold hands and feet? How to replenish qi and yang

      One guiding principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine is the yin yang theory.  In the natural world, there exists a balance between 2 opposing and co-existing forces and yet, they also exist in each other.  Our bodies, minds, and souls are designed the same way in that to be healthy, we need to be in harmony between these 2 bipolar states.  Yin is receptive and passive, calm and slow, embodying cold and damp qualities (when we are sleeping).  Yang is its exact opposite in aggressive and active, embodying heat, dryness, and movement (when we are awake).

      One of our mission at The Chinese Soup Lady is to bring these principles into the foods and drinks we consume in order to support harmony.  

      How to use this guide:

      • This is purely a reference guide 
      • Do see a Chinese medicine practitioner as this information is not a replacement for a doctor

      What does it mean to have cold hands and feet?

      Cold hands and feet are often associated with slow or weak Qi in the body, which is the critical energy source for being alert and active.

      You may also want to feel like you want to be warm all the time. This is because the circulation of both Qi and blood is slowed and doesn’t carry the blood or warmth as quickly. 

      Yang deficiency can also be mistaken for excess yin as they produce the same “cold feeling” in the body.  One key difference is how it shows up in the tongue and the amount of dampness in the body.

      Symptoms of yang deficiency vs excess yang:

      • The color, texture, and coating of the tongue is different.  For deficiency in yang, the tongue will be swollen with a pale, clear (or translucent white) tongue with a wet coating, while a excess in yin will likely be indicated by a yellow or white thicker wet coating on the tongue.  
      • While both can show up as feeling cold in the body, excess yin will usually be associated with phlegm in the lungs, where yang deficiency will not.
      • Their cause also differs from how these conditions emerge.  For deficiency in yang, this is normally caused by internally driven conditions such as overworking, overexercising, or overexertion of the body.  In order to have excess yin, this normally starts with over exposure to external wind-cold or over exposure to dampness, which can include both weather, conditions (such as humidity) or cold and damp foods (such as ice cream, cold drinks, cold and raw fruit, and even salads – which is why the Chinese cook all their vegetables normally).

      Type of soups and teas to make to replenish qi and yang (for yang deficiency):

      Here are a few key principles to think about when designing or making soups that will help with yang deficiency and to help you replenish qi and yang.

      •  Use dried red dates in your teas or soups and be sure to have the pits removed as they are fiery and can create too much heat in the body.  Red dates help tonify the qi and blood, which also replenishes qi and blood, and helps those who have too much “cold” in the body, helping it warm up. 
      • Use fresh ginger as well, to support yang deficiency.  This is a powerhouse ingredient that warms and helps with qi circulation, especially around the middle burner (section around the stomach and contains all the digestive organs). 
      • The best protein for warming soups and to support yang deficiency is chicken.  My Chinese doctor recommends chicken breast (versus chicken with bones) so that you can maximize all the protein possible from the meat.  You can also use a black silkie chicken for this purpose.
      • Drink a power soup weekly (if you’re over 40 for a woman, as men can start at 50 and still be OK), especially if it’s winter. This is also a power soup for women who have just had a baby as “the postpartum period is critical for maternal health status after childbirth [1]”.

      1. Yang, Xiao et al. “Maternal postnatal confinement practices and postpartum depression in Chinese populations: A systematic review.” PloS one vol. 18,10 e0293667. 30 Oct. 2023, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0293667

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      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

      How to make a delicious Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables)

      Soup Name: Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables) Traditional Chinese Name: 番茄魚湯 (fān qié yú tāng). The literal translation of this is Tomato Fish Soup. However, this is such a generic name for the soup base (consisting usually of fish and tomatoes), but...

      How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

      Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

      How to make a delicious Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables)

      Soup Name: Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables) Traditional Chinese Name: 番茄魚湯 (fān qié yú tāng). The literal translation of this is Tomato Fish Soup. However, this is such a generic name for the soup base (consisting usually of fish and tomatoes), but...

      How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

      Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

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      FOLLOW US AND SHARE.

      5 Tips for Exercising in the Cold (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective)

      5 Tips for Exercising in the Cold (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective)

      5 Tips for Exercising in the Cold 

      (from a Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective)

      One guiding principle in Traditional Chinese Medicine is the yin yang theory.  In the natural world, there exists a balance between 2 opposing and co-existing forces and yet, they also exist in each other.  Our bodies, minds, and souls are designed the same way in that to be healthy, we need to be in harmony between these 2 bipolar states.  Yin is receptive and passive, calm and slow, embodying cold and damp qualities (when we are sleeping).  Yang is its exact opposite in aggressive and active, embodying heat, dryness, and movement (when we are awake).

      One of our mission at The Chinese Soup Lady is to bring these principles into the foods and drinks we consume in order to support harmony.  

      You can explore more about some Traditional Chinese Medicine theories in these posts.

      What’s the coldest you can exercise in outdoors?

      From a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, there exists a balance between hot vs cold and moisture vs dryness. 

      It’s typically looked at in this light where you can have excess yang (heat) in the body, but is it a dry heat or an excess moisture heat?  The same applies for excess yin (cold).  Is this a dry excess yin or excess moisture in yin?  

      This is where it also depends on external conditions, such as Toronto in the winter yields a dry cold, whereas in Hong Kong, it’s a wet (humid) cold.  

      It’s important to pay attention to how these conditions then blend with how you’re feeling internally.

      Get to know your own body…

      How aware are you of your own body?

      How aware are you of how your body reacts in different conditions?

      Each of us are created uniquely and beautifully.  This is where one person’s condition and reaction are different from another person’s, even in the same external environment and diets!

      Here’s a tip to develop an awareness of yourself.

      • Be best friends with your tongue.  Take a pause to notice how it feels (Are there are any rough spots? Any ridges?).  Stick it out when you’re brushing your teeth.  How is its color?  Any ridges?  
      • Signs of excess yang (or yin deficiency) can include a rough feeling tongue, canker or cold sores, rough patches, or extra red tongue.  It’s not by any means a diagnosis, but here’s where I’ll stop eating fried foods, stop drinking warming soups, and substitute for something like a cooling chrysanthemum herbal tea.

      I would love to hear if you’ve got other ideas!  Drop them in the comments or any of my social channels and I’ll give you a shout out and add it to the post!

      EXPLORE MORE

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

      How to make a delicious Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables)

      Soup Name: Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables) Traditional Chinese Name: 番茄魚湯 (fān qié yú tāng). The literal translation of this is Tomato Fish Soup. However, this is such a generic name for the soup base (consisting usually of fish and tomatoes), but...

      How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

      Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      How to Make a Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea

      Tea Name: Warming Healing Mandarin Chinese Herbal Tea Traditional Chinese Name: 保暖茶 (bǎo nuǎn chá) – direct translation here is “keep warm tea”. This is a very generic name for teas that keep you warm. Nature:  Warming Taste: Sweet and slightly bitter (You can read...

      How to make an Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat

      Tea Name: Apple Cinnamon Chinese Herbal Tea for Eliminating Damp-Wind and Damp-Heat Traditional Chinese Name: 蘋果祛濕茶 (píng guǒ qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “apple remove damp” tea. There are many damp removal Chinese herbal teas and this one blends flavours...

      How to make a delicious Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables)

      Soup Name: Cantonese-styled Tomato Fish Soup (with vegetables) Traditional Chinese Name: 番茄魚湯 (fān qié yú tāng). The literal translation of this is Tomato Fish Soup. However, this is such a generic name for the soup base (consisting usually of fish and tomatoes), but...

      How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

      Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

      Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

      Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

      GIVE YOUR LOVE OF SOUP.

      FOLLOW US AND SHARE.