Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Confinement)

Soup Name:

Sweet and Sour Pork with Ginger (for Chinese Confinement)

Traditional Chinese Name:

糖醋排骨 (táng cù páigǔ)

For cooking videos, visit us on YouTube. 

This is another one of those great recipes that are handed down through generations. I got this from an Auntie who is an amazing cook and simplified this recipe so that it’s so simple and yet, tastes so good! You can use a variety of rib cuts – I’ve made it with the traditional Chinese spare ribs cut (pictured here), but also made it using baby back ribs, too. When I make this, I use the measurements as a base, but adjust it as it cooks. I know some people prefer it sweeter or more sour or more salty, so definitely sample your cooking as you go!

For this recipe, I will use a fatter cut of meat. This is because it stews for quite some time and you don’t want the pork to dry out and shrivel up into dried pork. Over time, the fat will come out and you can simply scoop it out before consumption.

I will also rinse the pork in warm water when I get them from the vendor (just in case). Then throw it into a stainless steel pot and follow this simple base for recipe. It’s basically 1-2-3 (tablespoons).

1 tablespoon of soy sauce
2 tablespoons of sugar (any type)
3 tablespoons of white vinegar

And then you proportion it out appropriately. So for the amount picture above, which is around 1 pound of spare ribs, I multiplied by 3, so I got 3 tablespoons of soy sauce, 6 tablespoons of sugar, and 9 tablespoons of white vinegar. If you want, you can add a quarter cup of water for good measure. For confinement, my recommendation is to load up on ginger. This can be ginger slices, ginger cubes, the whole ginger, grated ginger, ginger juice – however spicy you can take it, do it. Optional ingredients also include whole garlic, black or white pepper and even star anise.

What’s involved?

Prep time: 10 mins

Cook time: 30+ mins (checking every 10 mins based on softness of meat and viscosity of the sauce)

Total time: 40+ mins

Serves: 1 large bowl

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of fresh spare ribs or pork ribs
  • 1 x 3 = 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 2 x 3 = 6 tablespoons of sugar
  • 3 x 3 = 9 tablespoons of white vinegar
  • 1-inch root of fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup of water

Instructions

  1. Rinse your spare ribs or pork ribs in warm water (to clean)
  2. Put all the ingredients into a stainless steel pot (or clay pot)
  3. Boil on high heat for 10 minutes
  4. Reduce to a low simmer for another hour, checking every 10 minutes on taste and whether it is drying out too much. If so, add another quarter cup of water.
  5. Remove oil and serve

A selection of confinement Chinese Soups

What is confinement and confinement stories

Baby 5 & 6 Confinement story

Some confinement foods for your tummy!

The DO's and DON'T's of confinement

EXPLORE MORE

How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

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How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...

How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

If you're planning to visit Taiwan, here are a few key things you should look for during your visit.  I've been to Taiwan many times and every time, it feels like the first time!  The food options are many and continue to evolve and change with every visit! For...

How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...

Vietnamese Pho – Beef Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup

 

One of my favourite soups of all time is the Vietnamese beef broth that is made for pho noodles, or specifically, Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup.  I first truly learned it while travelling to Vietnam and took a cooking course given by locals, and my life has never been the same! After learning the original base, you can pretty much tweak it as you like.  The good thing is that I live in Asia, and all the ingredients are readily available. The challenge is that to make a good beef soup base, you need to boil it for quite some time – we’re looking at a solid 3 hours or more (like all broths).  Even if you can’t find all the ingredients, no worries – just improvise!

Soup NameVietnamese Pho – Beef Noodle Soup

Traditional Chinese Name:  越南牛肉河粉 (Yuè nán niú ròu hé fěn)

If you want to skip my running commentary, just go to the bottom for the full, quick-read recipe.

First, you need FRESH ingredients. I’m talking about fresh beef bones, fresh vegetables, and fresh beef slices.  For this round, I used beef ribs. They are giant bones, so you’ll need a giant pot! I use a thermal pot to save electricity and it does the boiling for me so I can go out!  The recipe usually calls for fresh beef knuckles or leg bones (with plenty of marrow goodness) – but these tend to be more fatty in nature, so just be sure to skim off the oil (and scum) when it surfaces.

Fresh Beef Bones

Fresh Beef Bones

Start by blanching all the bones in a separate pot of boiling water for about 5 minutes. This will remove impurities, scum and oil off the bones in preparation for your soup.

You can also begin to char the fresh ginger and fresh onions – usually done with an oven or on an open flame. This will bring out the wonderfully natural flavours of these ingredients.  I can already smell the onions as they broil in the oven and I’m not even on to making the soup yet!

Fresh ginger and onions for Vietnamese Pho

Fresh ginger and onions for Vietnamese Pho

Charred fresh ginger and onions

Charred fresh ginger and onions

Next are the spices. In Asian supermarkets, you can usually buy them pre-packaged as a bundle, but if not, you’ll need a handle of each for the flavouring.  Pick up some star anise, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon sticks, fennel, and coriander. You’ll also need a soup mesh bag to keep all the spices together because at some point, you’ll need to remove them and it’s way easier this way!

Soup mesh bag with spices for Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup

Soup mesh bag with spices for Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup

For the soup base, you’ll also need fish sauce, salt, and rock sugar. In the meantime, just throw in the blanched beef bones, charred ginger and onions, spices, salt, fish sauce and rock sugar into a large pot of boiling water and boil uncovered for at least 2 – 2.5 hours.

Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup base

Vietnamese Pho Beef Noodle Soup base

I was taught that at around this point, you should remove all the floating ingredients of the broth and taste test the soup for saltiness or flavour. You can adjust the taste by adding either more fish sauce, more salt or more sugar depending on what fits your taste.  Do this in small amounts so that you never go overboard because it’s pretty darn hard to remove dissolved salt – or at least correct without adding more water, which will then dilute the beef stock.  I personally don’t even take out the ingredients and taste it like that and serve. Whatever tickles your fancy as a chef.

Also start to soak your dried Vietnamese pho noodles.  Soak in a large pot of cool water for at least 15 minutes – or whatever the instructions of the noodles are. You can even use Thai noodles, Chinese rice noodles, or whatever noodles you like. Actually, it doesn’t really matter because you’re eating it!

At this point, I lay out the bowls – layering first the bottom with thinly sliced fresh white onion rings and bean sprouts. Or you can leave it up to your guest to lay their own, kind of like a buffet.

Fresh onions and bean sprouts ready for Vietnamese Pho

Fresh onions and bean sprouts ready for Vietnamese Pho

Put in noodles to the bowl, as much as you’ll eat.  I then blanch the fresh beef slices quickly in the broth and lay them on top as well and then ladle out that heavenly soup goodness so that it covers the beef completely.  Be sure the soup is still boiling at this time.  Top with fresh mint, cilantro, parsley, basil, more bean sprouts, chilli peppers and lime to finish it off. And ta-da! Yummy Vietnamese Pho, made from scratch!

Vietnamese Pho – Beef Noodle Soup
Recipe Type: Vietnamese Pho
Cuisine: Vietnamese
Author: LadyTong
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 4-5 pieces of [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/fresh-beef-bones/”]fresh beef bones[/url]
  • 2 [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/onions-fresh/”]fresh onions[/url], halved
  • 2 [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/ginger-fresh/”]fresh ginger[/url] pieces (2″ long each), halved
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tbsp of coriander seeds
  • 1 tbsp of fennel seeds
  • 5 whole [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/star-anise/”]star anise[/url]
  • 1 cardamom pod
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 1/4 cup of fish sauce
  • 1 inch chunk of [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/rock-sugar/”]rock sugar[/url]
  • 1/2 tbsp of salt
  • additional salt to taste
  • 3 L of water
  • 1 pack of dried Vietnamese noodles
  • 1 pound of [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/beef-slices/”]fresh beef slices[/url]
  • fresh limes
  • fresh [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/chinese-parsley-or-cilantro/”]cilantro[/url]
  • fresh mint leaves
  • fresh basil leaves
  • fresh bean sprouts
  • 2-3 fresh chilli peppers, chopped small
Instructions
  1. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch the beef bones to remove impurities, scum and fat
  2. Using an oven, char the halved onions and ginger in a pan until nicely browned, remove from oven and let cool
  3. Start to boil your soup water in a separate large pot
  4. Once your soup water boils, add in the beef bones, onions, ginger and spices (put into a mesh bag), fish sauce, rock sugar and salt
  5. Boil on medium heat for at least 3 hours
  6. Prepare the noodles by soaking them or following the instructions on the package
  7. Taste the soup at this point on whether you need to add more sugar, fish sauce or salt and add accordingly
  8. In a serving bowl, lay the bottom with sliced fresh onions, bean sprouts and noodles
  9. Blanch the freshly sliced beef quickly in the soup and lay on top of the noodles
  10. Ladle enough soup to cover the sliced beef and noodles
  11. Add as desired, fresh mint leaves, cilantro, basil, bean sprouts, parsley, chilli peppers and lime
  12. Serve and enjoy!

 

 

Miso Ramen

Miso ramen with peas, corn, narutomaki and soft-boiled egg

 

This simple, easy-to-make with readily available Japanese-styled Miso Ramen is awesome for a rainy day or when you need to whip up something quick. In short, Miso ramen can go with anything you can dig up in your fridge, including leftovers, frozen goodies or simply by itself. It’s so popular and so easy, it can be classified as instant noodles in Asia where manufacturers have made it into the 5 minute meal with all packaged sauces and condiments. In this version, I’m still using packaged dashi (Japanese fish stock) and miso, but one day, I will make dashi from scratch! We also purposefully went to buy some Japanese-styled  fish sticks, known as Narutokmaki, and some fancy looking “piggy” narutomaki. I love Japanese food (so does my whole family) and the Japanese culture, styling, food is highly prevalent in Hong Kong. To be honest with you, if I had to pick one cuisine which I had to eat for the rest of my life, it would be Japanese. And plus my kids all attended a Japanese International Kindergarten, they are/were highly influenced by their Japanese peers. You should see some of the award-winning Japanese lunch boxes that the Japanese moms prepare, they win hands down!

 

Soup Name: Miso Ramen

Traditional Chinese Name:  日本拉麵 (Rì běn lā miàn)

 

Miso Ramen
Recipe Type: Noodles
Cuisine: Japanese
Author: LadyTong
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • 2 oz of fresh ramen
  • 1/2 teaspoon [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/dashi-japanese-fish-stock/”]dashi powder[/url]
  • 1 tablespoon [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/miso-paste/”]miso paste[/url]
  • 1 [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/chicken-eggs/”]fresh egg[/url]
  • 1 tablespoon frozen or fresh peas
  • 1/2 [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/corn/”]fresh corn[/url], boiled and cut off the cob
  • slices of [url href=”http://www.thechinesesouplady.com/narutomaki/”]narutomaki[/url]
  • 3 pieces of sausages
  • 3 cups of water
Instructions
  1. In a pot, start boiling your water and add in the egg(s) while the water is still cold and the corn.
  2. Once the water starts boiling, add in the dashi and miso (to help also flavor the eggs and corn).
  3. Boil the eggs on medium heat for 8 minutes, remove and set aside to cool to peel later.
  4. Boil the corn for another 5 minutes, remove and let cool.
  5. Throw in the frozen peas, sausages, and the fresh ramen and boil for another 5 minutes (or until desirable tenderness).
  6. Remove ramen and put into a serving bowl.
  7. Scoop out peas and sausages and set aside.
  8. Add soy sauce to soup to desired saltiness (although with the amount of dashi and miso, to me, it’s sufficiently salty).
  9. Scoop desired amount of soup into serving bowl.
  10. Cut corn off the cob and serve on top of noodles.
  11. Rinse egg under cold water and gently remove the shell. Half the egg with a sharp knife. The middle should be soft and gorgeous!
  12. Place peas, sausages, narutomaki, corn on top and serve!

 

For my family, I made 4 portions, but the portioning of the toppings is really dependent on what people prefer. I am talking about custom-design Miso Ramen! For example, one child is crazy about green peas, so she pretty much ate them all! The other is crazy about narutomaki, so she also ate them all!

I boiled the corn in the miso and dashi soup at the beginning with the egg. This will help infuse flavor into the corn.

Shucked corn off the cob (boiled in miso soup for added flavor)

You can use either fresh or dried ramen. The fresh kind are pretty awesome though and can be bought at Japanese supermarkets in the cold sections.

Fresh ramen

For these types of noodles, the toppings can get as creative as your imagination.

You can use:

  • Any types of veggies really (corn, peas, carrots, bak choy, choy sum, onion, green onions…)
  • Any types of readily prepared meats (sausages, BBQ pork, sliced pork, ham, chicken strips, fish balls, beef balls…)
  • Japanese styled narutomaki (they are really creative with the types of narutomaki available – see piggies below!)

You can use ANY toppings you want!

Here are some really cute and yummy narutomaki piggies! The Japanese kiddies bring these to school as is and eat them with cute toothpicks.

CUTE narutomaki piggies!

The final product for the children. We turned it into “buffet-styled-make-your-own-ramen” dinner – so basically laid out all the toppings and just gave the kids a bowl of soup with ramen and let them figure out the rest! It’s a great activity and they loved it! Plus, you hold them accountable in all the food they took.

Japanese miso ramen – for kids!

 

 

Narutomaki or Naruto

Narutomaki or Japanese cured fish “stick”

Ingredient Name:  Narutomaki, Naruto (which is the name of a Japanese anime!)

Traditional Chinese Name: 鳴門巻き/なると巻き (narutomaki)

What is this?

  • The name “Naruto” is actually an Anime
  • Narutomaki – the maki is meant as a long roll or something in a cylindrical form – ie: “maki” sushi rolls
  • A steamed Japanese fish “stick” or “cake”, similar to the Chinese fish balls
  • It’s normally sold as one long, white stick in a flower shaped, with a pink swirl in the middle
  • The taste is slightly salty and fishy, but not a bad way. It’s actually quite delicious!

How do I prepare it?

  • They are edible when bought frozen or cold
  • You can quickly boil to make warm before adding directly on top of noodles, soup or other dishes

Where can I buy this?

  • Most Asian supermarkets will carry this
  • The frozen section of the wet marts in HK will also carry this (or the “fish ball vendors”)
  • Japanese supermarkets will definitely carry this such as Jusco, AEON and Apita

What is the cost?

  • In Hong Kong, 1 length cost between $12-15 HKD

Any benefits?

  • Ready-to-eat and slice directly from the freeze or fridge
  • They are great for kids because of the decorative look
  • Low in fat

Any precautions?

  • These products normally contain MSG and should be consumed in moderation
  • From my personal opinion, they are high in sodium (salt / NaCl)

 

Narutomaki in it’s pre-cut form being sliced

Ginger and Egg Fried Rice (for Chinese Confinement)

Ginger and Egg Fried Rice (for Chinese Confinement)

Ginger and Egg Fried Rice (for Chinese Confinement)

Soup Name:

Ginger and Egg Fried Rice (for Chinese Confinement)

Chinese Name: 雞蛋姜炒飯 (jī dàn jiāng chǎo fàn)

This dish is warming and designed to expel wind, replenish qi and blood.

 

For videos, visit us on YouTube.

This is a simple recipe part of our Confinement Series for new mothers. Designed to be heaty, healing and part of a balanced diet – actually anyone can eat this!

My version uses ginger juice (as I personally find the ginger shreds too spicy for my mild taste buds), but it is recommended to use the grated ginger flesh if you’re in confinement. Load on the ginger and black or white pepper! Other variations of this include adding chicken or pork, garlic and some neutral, diced veggies like choy sum.

And don’t forget to add that splash of sesame oil for both taste and warmth!

 

You can click here for more information on Chinese confinement.  

This recipe contains all the greats needed to get you through confinement (Sesame oil, ginger, black or white pepper ).

Ginger is excellent for warming the body and expelling wind (both important things to achieve during Chinese confinement). It is a nutritious and delicious course. This recipe is super easy to make.

I would recommend making a bowl / jar of pre-grated ginger so you can whip this up in less than 10 minutes. Any precautions? This is a heaty dish and not recommended for people who can’t too heaty foods or are currently overheated.

 

     

    What’s involved?

    Prep time: 10 mins

    Cook time: 15 mins

    Total time: 25 mins

    Serves: 1 cup of rice (but make more to store in the fridge for multiple consumption!)

    Ingredients
    • 1 tsp cooking oil
    • 1 bowl of rice (leftover rice best for fried rice)
    • 25g of fresh ginger, grated (produces 1 tablespoon of ginger juice)
    • 1 sprig of fresh green onions, diced
    • 1 egg
    • sesame oil
    • black or white pepper to taste
    • salt to taste
    Cooking Instructions
    1. In a frying pan on medium heat, add oil and start frying the rice (re-heating it for 2 minutes)
    2. Add in fresh ginger juice or grated ginger
    3. Add in fresh green onions
    4. Fry together for 2 minutes
    5. In the middle of the pan, open a hole and crack the egg directly into it, stirring and mixing the egg until relatively cooked
    6. Stir it altogether and add sesame oil, pepper, and salt to taste
    7. Serve and enjoy!

    A selection of confinement Chinese Soups

    What is confinement and confinement stories

    Baby 5 & 6 Confinement story

    Some confinement foods for your tummy!

    The DO's and DON'T's of confinement

    EXPLORE MORE

    How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

    Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

    Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

    Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

    How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

    Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

    What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

    If you're planning to visit Taiwan, here are a few key things you should look for during your visit.  I've been to Taiwan many times and every time, it feels like the first time!  The food options are many and continue to evolve and change with every visit! For...

    How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

    Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...

    How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

    Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

    Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

    Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

    How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

    Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

    What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

    If you're planning to visit Taiwan, here are a few key things you should look for during your visit.  I've been to Taiwan many times and every time, it feels like the first time!  The food options are many and continue to evolve and change with every visit! For...

    How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

    Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...

    Soy Sauce Chicken Wings and Feet (for Chinese Confinement)

    Soy Sauce Chicken Wings and Feet (for Chinese Confinement)

    Soy Sauce Chicken Wings and Feet (for Chinese Confinement)

    Soup Name:

    Soy Sauce Chicken Wings and Feet (for Chinese Confinement)

    Chinese Name: 醬油雞腳 (jiàng yóu jī jiǎo)

     

    For more videos, visit us on YouTube.

    This is a very common Canton (Chinese-styled) dish. The soy sauce base can be used with pork, chicken (various parts), duck (wings are best), pigeon and any other meats with bones as best. The trick to this dish is that it must be simmered for some time (or use a pressure cooker) to let both the sauce seep deep into the meat and enable the meet to be almost falling off the bone.

    Why this particular dish is called out for Chinese confinement is that the chicken feet provides a healthy amount of collagen – and adding warming ingredients such as ginger, star anise and cinnamon help keep the body warm and heated throughout this period. My mom actually used to keep the sauce after she made it in a glass jar in the fridge, to be used again the next time around. The more it’s used, the tastier it gets. You can simply skim off the accumulated fat once it’s cooled and add more soy sauce if it’s been reduced too far. A delicious, easy-to-make, easy-to-keep Chinese confinement dish for any postpartum mother.

    What’s involved?

    Prep time: 15 mins

    Cook time: 45 mins

    Total time: 60 mins

    Serves: 4

    Ingredients
    • 20 fresh (or frozen) chicken feet, nails cut off
    • 10 fresh chicken wings
    • 3/4 cup of soy sauce
    • 4 cups of boiling (or hot) water
    • 3 tablespoons of brown sugar
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 2 pieces of star anise
    • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
    • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, sliced and peeled
    • 1 scallion, diced (optional)
    • White pepper (optional and recommended for Chinese Confinement)
    Cooking Instructions
    1. Cut off the nails of the chicken feet
    2. In a pot of boiling water, blanch the chicken feet and chicken wings for 3 minutes (to flush out the oil in the chicken feet)
    3. In a fresh pot, add all the ingredients together and let simmer for 45 minutes (or longer if you want it softer)
    4. Top with fresh scallions as needed
    5. Serve and enjoy!

    A selection of confinement Chinese Soups

    What is confinement and confinement stories

    Baby 5 & 6 Confinement story

    Some confinement foods for your tummy!

    The DO's and DON'T's of confinement

    EXPLORE MORE

    How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

    Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

    Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

    Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

    How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

    Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

    What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

    If you're planning to visit Taiwan, here are a few key things you should look for during your visit.  I've been to Taiwan many times and every time, it feels like the first time!  The food options are many and continue to evolve and change with every visit! For...

    How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

    Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...

    How to make vegetarian green and white radish carrot Chinese herbal soup packs

    Tea Name: Vegetarian Green and White Radish and Carrots Chinese Herbal Soup Packs Traditional Chinese Name: 紅青蘿蔔湯 (hóng qing luóbo tang). Literal translation is "red pale radish soup".  The red means the carrots (usually), the pale means the green radish (usually),...

    Strengthen spleen and remove dampness with this warming Chinese herbal tea

    Tea Name: Spleen strengthening damp removing herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 健脾祛濕茶 (jiàn pí qū shī chá) – direct translation here is “spleen strength remove damp” tea.  This is also quite a generic name in terms of the function of the tea rather than the...

    How to make fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli, tofu, and napa cabbage

    Soup Name: Fragrant salted egg soup base with vermicelli and napa cabbage (optional vegetarian-styled) Traditional Chinese Name: 鹹蛋集菜湯 (xián dàn jí cài tāng) – direct translation here is "salty egg vegetable soup". Nature:  Neutral Taste: Salty and sweet (You can read...

    What to eat in Taiwan… here’s to cycling and eating my way through Taiwan!

    If you're planning to visit Taiwan, here are a few key things you should look for during your visit.  I've been to Taiwan many times and every time, it feels like the first time!  The food options are many and continue to evolve and change with every visit! For...

    How to soothe a cough with this Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea!

    Tea Name: Chinese orange monk fruit herbal tea Traditional Chinese Name: 止咳茶 (zhǐké chá) – direct translation here is “anti-cough” tea.  There are many teas that have earned the right to this label, so it’s just easier to use it as such instead of labeling all the...